Institute for Policy Integrity

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News & Events

In the News

  • Letters to the Editor: Guns and Domestic Violence

    December 31, 2017 – The New York Times

    Without a doubt, stronger limits on abusers’ ability to obtain guns are needed to save women’s lives. An equally critical step that Congress can take is to improve access to protective orders by increasing funding for the Legal Services Corporation. According to a recent report from the Institute for Policy Integrity, 83 percent of victims represented by an attorney successfully obtained a protective order, as compared with just 32 percent of victims without an attorney.

  • Trump Stretches Meaning of Deregulation in Touting Achievements

    December 29, 2017 – Bloomberg

    In the Dec. 14 press conference, Trump said the government had taken 67 deregulatory actions through Sept. 30 — with an annual savings to society of $570 million — and had imposed just three new regulations. The administration’s cost figures ignore projected benefits for regulations it has blocked, distorting the actual impacts on society, said Denise Grab, a lawyer with the Institute for Policy Integrity at New York University’s School of Law.

  • The Biggest Environmental Rulings Of 2017

    December 15, 2017 – Law360

    Courts answered several important environmental law questions in 2017, including how the effects of greenhouse gases must be factored into project analyses. In August, a divided D.C. Circuit panel said the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission failed to adequately analyze the greenhouse gas emissions impacts of a project that it approved and ordered the agency to redo its environmental review. Ricky Revesz, a law professor at New York University and director of the Institute for Policy Integrity, said the ruling adds to a growing body of case law showing that federal agencies must meaningfully consider the greenhouse gas emission impacts of their policy decisions.

  • Industries That Cheered Trump’s Climate Regulation Rollbacks Now Worry They’ll Go Too Far

    November 30, 2017 – The Los Angeles Times

    An intensifying debate between the climate change skeptics looking to strike a death blow to federal greenhouse gas restrictions and a growing chorus of electricity and manufacturing companies warning that such a move would backfire could ultimately test who has the most White House clout in setting energy policy. Richard Revesz, director of the Institute for Policy Integrity at the New York University School of Law, warns that repeal without replacement “could open the floodgates for litigation” and expose power companies that were to be regulated under the Clean Power Plan to “significant and highly uncertain liabilities.”

  • What We Talk About When We Talk About Resilience

    November 30, 2017 – Utility Dive (Opinion)

    In the coming weeks, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) will announce its response to the Department of Energy’s Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR). As long as FERC decides to do something, it has to deal with a fundamental issue. The NOPR failed to answer the most critical question: just what is resilience? This question is not just a matter of semantics. Without a precise definition, FERC cannot determine whether the grid is sufficiently resilient, or gauge whether payments or other actions might be warranted.

  • Material World: Global Warming Is Coming for Your Shopping Cart

    November 28, 2017 – Bloomberg

    In future decades, the food we eat, beverages we drink and clothes we wear may all be altered by the warming planet. In the second of two episodes about climate change, Jenny and Lindsey dig into the future impact of global warming on shoppers. They talk with Andrea Illy, Chief Executive Officer of IllyCaffe; Dr. Peter Howard, economics director at the Institute for Policy Integrity at New York University’s School of Law; and Cecilia Strömblad Brännsten, a sustainability business expert at H&M.

  • What Does Mulvaney’s Appointment Mean for the Future of CFPB?

    November 28, 2017 – USA Today

    “I do think it’s clear that Cordray’s departure will bring the CFPB closer into the president’s orbit,” said Richard L. Revesz, a law professor at New York University. “And the fact of the matter is that the director — the permanent director, whoever the president nominates — will also share the president’s agenda.”

  • EPA Revises the Social Cost of a Potent Greenhouse Gas

    November 20, 2017 – Scientific American

    Jason Schwartz, a research scholar at New York University School of Law, slammed the Trump administration’s changes to calculations for the social cost of greenhouse gases. “They have begun to manipulate those estimates in ways that are not at all consistent with the best science or economics,” he said. A guide on the social cost of greenhouse gases co-authored by Schwartz and published by NYU’s Institute for Policy Integrity argues that using a domestic-emissions-only approach doesn’t make sense for the United States or the rest of the world.

  • The Trump Administration’s American Climate Exceptionalism

    November 16, 2017 – Think Progress

    Legal and environmental experts warn that the Trump administration’s willingness to eschew scientific consensus for political advantage typifies a worrying trend. “The administration is definitely trying to mess with the numbers to make it look like they’re saving money on these repeals,” Denise Grab, western regional director for the Institute for Policy Integrity, told ThinkProgress. “But they aren’t considering the massive benefits to the public, and the economic and scientific consensus on the substantial benefits that could be achieved by reducing this greenhouse gas pollution.”

  • Material World: How Climate Change Affects What You Buy

    November 15, 2017 – Bloomberg

    In this week’s Material World, Lindsey and Jenny dive into how changes in the environment are showing up in stores and businesses. Dr. Peter Howard, the economics director at the Institute for Policy Integrity at NYU’s School of Law, explains how changing global temperatures and climate could have ripple effects on businesses and shoppers. Bloomberg’s Jordyn Holman discusses her reporting in Puerto Rico after it was hit by Hurricane Maria and the director of the Florida Department of Citrus describes Hurricane Irma’s impact on growers.