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  • Pruitt Would Like Us to Ignore Environmental Regulations’ Indirect Benefits

    June 13, 2018 – Slate

    Rewriting agency guidelines to ignore co-benefits might sound like a mundane accounting change, but over time it would have grave effects on public health and welfare. This change would make it appear that regulations deliver fewer benefits relative to their costs than they in fact would. This would then make it easier for Pruitt to justify repealing rules, further tilting the scales toward the powerful polluters that he insistently favors—while severely disadvantaging the families and communities that bear the heavy burden of pollution.

  • Pushing for the Public Interest

    June 6, 2018 – U.S. News and World Report

    Publicly owned lands in the United States contain many of the country’s most iconic natural areas as well as a wealth of natural resources. But these taxpayer-owned assets are on the verge of being given away for a fraction of their true value in an effort to prop up the uneconomical mining and drilling operations of some fossil-fuel companies, who clearly have the Department of the Interior’s ear.

  • Sulfur Dioxide Damages Lungs, and Scott Pruitt Is Letting More of It in Our Air

    May 15, 2018 – Mother Jones

    Congress “never intended for these [coal] plants to operate forever. This was supposed to be a temporary transition ending at the end of their useful life,” said Revesz, co-author of Struggling for Air: Power Plants and the “War on Coal.” Instead, “We’ve created a monster.”

  • Will Pruitt’s Repeal Come With Replacement Plan?

    May 9, 2018 – Scientific American

    If EPA’s replacement doesn’t come out at the same time as the final repeal, that could compound the agency’s problems, said Richard Revesz, director of New York University’s Institute for Policy Integrity. “EPA has a duty to regulate [greenhouse gas] emissions. To have a repeal without a replacement, among other problems, they are violating those duties,” he said.

  • California May Out Muscle EPA In Car Emissions Case, But Markets Rule On Electric Vehicles

    May 2, 2018 – Forbes

    “In withdrawing the 2022-2025 greenhouse-gas standards, EPA arbitrarily ignored its own prior analysis as well as the facts,” said Bethany Davis Noll, director at the Institute for Policy Integrity at New York University School of Law. “The agency is acting without clear justification and creating a lot of legal question marks.”

  • Regulatory Impact Assessment in the Age of Partisan Volatility

    May 2, 2018 – The Regulatory Review (Opinion)

    The Trump Administration has defined its policy program in terms of reversing the prior Administration’s decisions on as many fronts as possible. Although this turnabout has been particularly intense, it actually marks a continuation of a long-developing trend.

  • States Sue EPA Over Plan to Weaken Vehicle Emissions Standards

    May 1, 2018 – ThinkProgress

    The Institute for Policy Integrity at NYU School of Law has released a new report analyzing EPA’s decision to withdraw the standards that concludes the agency’s basis for withdrawing the standards is not grounded in fact or economic analysis. For example, EPA cites factors such as lower fuel prices and concerns about the growth of electric vehicles as reasons to reverse its earlier decision, but both fuel prices and electric vehicle sales are in fact rising.

  • States Sue The EPA To Protect Obama-Era Fuel Efficiency Standards

    May 1, 2018 – NPR

    A report released by the Institute for Policy Integrity at the New York University School of Law said the EPA’s reasoning was “not grounded in fact.” For instance, the EPA says lower gas prices are making fuel-efficient cars less attractive, and cites flagging demand for electric cars as a sign the current standards are unrealistic.

  • How Technology and Artificial Intelligence Can Improve Regulation

    April 23, 2018 – The Hill (Opinion)

    Opportunities to learn about and comment on regulation abound online, leading to an explosion of public participation. It is now common for agencies to receive over 1 million public comments on a proposed regulation. But agencies don’t have the person-power to process all that information, resulting in costly delays and undercounted perspectives.

  • Scott Pruitt Hasn’t Saved Taxpayers Anything

    April 9, 2018 – ThinkProgress

    Looking just at compliance costs also ignores the vast number of benefits — both economic and social — that regulations like the Clean Power Plan can have for society overall. According to a 2017 analysis by the Institute for Policy Integrity at New York University’s School of Law, for instance, costs of the Clean Power Plan would have been about $5.1 and $8.4 billion annually, while benefits would have been about $54 billion annually. This means that the Clean Power Plan would have created a net economic benefit of between $45.6 billion and $48.9 billion.