Institute for Policy Integrity

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In the News

  • An Empirical Analysis of the Establishment of Independent Agencies

    July 13, 2017 – The Regulatory Review

    A significant concern of administrative law is the status of independent agencies—agencies that are insulated in some ways from direct presidential control. These institutional relationships are particularly important when the President and agency officials disagree over law and policy. In our recent article, The Genesis of Independent Agencies, we ask a core question of administrative law: When are agencies established with features that insulate them from direct presidential control?

  • Trump Follows Through on Deregulation, but at What Cost?

    June 23, 2017 – The Hill (Opinion)

    Eliminating regulatory safeguards will erase tangible public health and environmental benefits, making the public worse off. Rather than analyze these societal costs, President Trump’s agency heads have suspended rules in a flurry of deregulatory actions, without calculating or even acknowledging the effects.

  • Showing the Cost Side of the Climate Equation in a New Light

    June 16, 2017 – Carbon Tax Center

    I’m tempted to call it the decade’s most important paper on the costs of climate damage. The paper, just published in Environmental and Resource Economics, by Peter Howard, economics director at NYU Law School’s Institute for Policy Integrity; and Thomas Sterner, professor of environmental economics at the University of Gothenburg, upends the long-prevailing approach for estimating the social cost of carbon, potentially laying the ground for putting the SCC into triple digits.

  • What Counts As Climate Consensus?

    June 12, 2017 – The National Review

    Oren Cass’s article “Who’s the Denier Now?” (May 1) condemns the misuse of scientific data in climate-change policy debates, but to support his position Cass misrepresents the findings in our survey of economists and cherry-picks survey data to suggest that “economists hold widely varying views” on the costs of climate change.

  • Why Coal Can’t Compete on a True Level Playing Field

    May 26, 2017 – The Wall Street Journal

    The Trump administration has diagnosed a legitimate problem with distorted energy markets, but an honest attempt to stop picking winners would require eliminating all subsidies, many of which favor coal.

  • Experts Reject Bjørn Lomborg’s View on 2C Warming Target

    May 20, 2017 – The Guardian

    Climate economist Peter Howard, the economics director at New York University’s Institute for Policy Integrity, said the assessment paper provided “insufficient reasons for abandoning a 2°C limit”.

  • Walking Away from Paris: Trump’s Choice Between Impulsive Versus Savvy Climate Sabotage

    May 19, 2017 – Medium (Opinion)

    Trump’s final decision on Paris will still tell us a great deal about how the administration plans to go about the business of undermining climate progress, and how successful it is ultimately likely to be.

  • DOL Rule Delay Faces High Hurdle

    May 18, 2017 – Barron’s

    “A new delay would essentially amount to an effective repeal and that is something that would have to be justified,” Bethany Davis Noll, an attorney with the Institute for Policy Integrity at the New York University School of Law, tells the publication. “Labor has a huge burden to overcome if they want to delay this.”

  • State Experimentation and the Clean Power Plan

    May 16, 2017 – Medium

    State climate policy efforts not only help reduce emissions, but provide a means of political experimentation that offers data on what might work to escape the climate policy gridlock. There are many contexts in which well-organized and well-networked interest groups will be in a better position to learn from experimentation than public interest groups. Thus the “peril” associated with experimentation: the bad guys may often be able to translate political information into policy advantage.

  • Cutting SCC Too Costly

    May 13, 2017 – Times Union (Opinion)

    New York, as a leader in energy policy, has embraced the Social Cost of Carbon in many recent landmark regulatory decisions. But now the state Public Service Commission is being wrongly attacked for using the SCC in its zero-emission credits (ZECs) program. If the Legislature halts this program, it would be a massive setback for climate change action in New York and around the country.