Institute for Policy Integrity

Twitter @policyintegrity

Publications

The Institute for Policy Integrity produces three types of publications: policy briefs, reports, and academic articles/working papers. Our policy briefs provide incisive and focused analysis on timely policy topics. Our reports develop deeper research on our core issues. Our academic articles and working papers offer original scholarly research and analysis from established experts as well as fresh new voices.

Latest Publications

  • Best Cost Estimate of Greenhouse Gases
    Academic Article/Working Paper

    Best Cost Estimate of Greenhouse Gases

    By Richard Revesz, Michael Greenstone, Michael Hanemann, Michael Livermore, Thomas Sterner, Denise Grab, Peter Howard, and Jason Schwartz
    August 18, 2017

    Despite the Trump administration’s decision to withdraw the official estimate of the Social Cost of Carbon and disband the interagency working group that developed it, a group of prominent economists and lawyers, including several Policy Integrity staff members, have highlighted the metric’s continued validity for policymaking in recent letter published in the journal Science.

  • Estimating the Health Benefits of Environmental Regulations
    Academic Article/Working Paper

    Estimating the Health Benefits of Environmental Regulations

    By Al McGartland, Richard Revesz, Daniel A. Axelrad, Chris Dockins, Patrice Sutton, and Tracey J. Woodruff
    August 4, 2017

    Regulating toxic pollutants benefits society by limiting public exposure to harmful pollution. By accurately quantifying these benefits, policymakers can improve the design of regulations that protect public health and better communicate the magnitude of these protections to the public. A new article in the journal Science examines how this process can be improved.

  • The One‐In, Two‐Out Executive Order Is a Zero
    Academic Article/Working Paper

    The One‐In, Two‐Out Executive Order Is a Zero

    By Caroline Cecot and Michael A. Livermore
    June 19, 2017

    President Trump’s Executive Order 13,771 directs each agency to repeal at least two existing regulations before issuing a new one and imposes a regulatory budget that sets a cap on total incremental regulatory costs. In this essay, Caroline Cecot and Michael Livermore evaluate the Order against three priorities that have been adopted by prior administrations or promoted by scholars, commentators, or interest groups: (1) increasing net benefits of regulation, (2) decreasing regulatory burdens, and (3) increasing presidential control over agencies. They also compare the Order against the regulatory reform efforts in other countries.

    The authors conclude that the Order is unlikely to achieve any of these goals without significant changes. They urge President Trump to scrap the Order and instead ensure that agencies engage in reasonable retrospective review of existing regulations and that the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs has sufficient staff to oversee agency decisionmaking, among other sensible reforms.