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Publications

Viewing all publications in Climate Change and Energy Policy
  • Familiar Territory
    Academic Article/Working Paper

    Familiar Territory

    A Survey of Legal Precedents for the Clean Power Plan

    By Richard L. Revesz, Denise A. Grab, and Jack Lienke
    December 4, 2015

    In this essay, we highlight a wide variety of regulations from the Clean Air Act’s forty-five-year history that provide substantial precedent for the flexible design of the Clean Power Plan.

  • The Economic Climate
    Academic Article/Working Paper

    The Economic Climate

    Establishing Expert Consensus on the Economics of Climate Change

    By Peter Howard and Derek Sylvan
    November 30, 2015

    This working paper offers detailed analysis of our survey of economic experts on climate change issues. We surveyed all those who published an article on climate change in a highly ranked economics journal over the past 20 years. The survey focused on estimated climate impacts and appropriate policy responses, and the results reveal several areas where expert consensus exists on these issues.

  • Foreign Action, Domestic Windfall
    Report

    Foreign Action, Domestic Windfall

    The U.S. Economy Stands to Gain Trillions from Foreign Climate Action

    By Peter Howard and Jason Schwartz
    November 5, 2015

    Global actions on climate change have already helped the United States avoid more than $200 billion in direct economic damage. Trillions of dollars more for the United States are at stake in securing commitments for future emissions reductions from foreign countries.

  • Reconsidering Coal’s Fair Market Value
    Report

    Reconsidering Coal’s Fair Market Value

    The Social Costs of Coal Production and the Need for Fiscal Reform

    By Jayni Foley Hein and Peter Howard
    October 5, 2015

    Coal mining on federal lands accounts for more than 40 percent of all coal produced in the United States. But outdated policies, longstanding loopholes, and prevalent environmental externalities keep American taxpayers from receiving their fair share of value from federal coal leases.

  • Capturing Value
    Policy Brief

    Capturing Value

    Science and Strategies to Curb Methane Emissions from the Oil and Natural Gas Sector

    By Jayni Foley Hein
    December 19, 2014

    Methane, the primary component of natural gas, is a potent climate pollutant up to 86 times more powerful than carbon dioxide on a 20-year timeframe. Currently the United States loses at least 1 to 3 percent of its total natural gas production each year when methane is leaked or vented to the atmosphere. Federal regulations could reduce methane emissions by up to 50 percent at little or no net cost, using available technologies.