Institute for Policy Integrity

Twitter @policyintegrity

Publications

Viewing all publications in Transparency
  • The Price of Neglect
    Report

    The Price of Neglect

    The Hidden Environmental and Public Health Costs of Bad Economics

    By Inimai M. Chettiar, Michael A. Livermore, and Jason A Schwartz
    November 19, 2008

    This report examines the regulatory failures of the Bush years on issues as wide-ranging as climate change and workplace safety, and concludes that these failures did not arise because of an overuse of economics, but because economic and scientific evidence was ignored.

  • The Cost-Benefit Compass
    Policy Brief

    The Cost-Benefit Compass

    Navigating the Perfect Storm of Economic, Environmental, and Energy Challenges

    By Michael A. Livermore
    October 21, 2008

    The Cost-Benefit Compass: Navigating the Perfect Storm of Economic, Environmental, and Energy Challenges discusses how the next administration can use cost-benefit analysis to address the three great interrelated challenges facing the country.

  • Cause or Cure?
    Academic Article/Working Paper

    Cause or Cure?

    Cost-Benefit Analysis and Regulatory Gridlock

    By Michael A. Livermore
    September 8, 2008

    In Cause or Cure?: Cost-Benefit Analysis and Regulatory Gridlock, Michael A. Livermore argues that cost-benefit analysis can be used to overcome regulatory paralysis. An earlier version of this working paper was presented at the Breaking the Logjam Conference at NYU Law in the spring of 2008.

  • Retaking Rationality
    Book

    Retaking Rationality

    How Cost-Benefit Analysis Can Better Protect the Environment and Our Health

    By Richard L. Revesz and Michael A. Livermore
    April 22, 2008

    In Retaking Rationality: How Cost-Benefit Analysis Can Better Protect the Environment and Our Health (Oxford University Press, 2008), Dean Richard L. Revesz and Michael A. Livermore argue for a more rational approach to cost-benefit analysis and regulation. They show how traditional cost-benefit analysis tends to overestimate costs and underestimate benefits, leading to less-than-optimal levels of regulation.