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Recent Projects

Viewing recent projects in Climate Change and Energy Policy
  • News

    EPA and DOT Finalize 2017-2025 Fuel Economy Standards

    August 28, 2012

    The DOT and EPA finalized fuel efficiency standards today for cars and light duty trucks, increasing fuel efficiency to 54.5 mpg by Model Year 2025. The agencies calculate that consumer savings under the new standards will be comparable to lowering the price of gasoline by $1 per gallon by 2025.

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  • Public Comments

    Comments to EPA on Adding Flexibility to Greenhouse Gas Rules

    June 25, 2012

    Sadly, the idea that market forces can drive down the cost of public health regulation has lost favor in the past few years. The EPA’s long-delayed, first-ever greenhouse gas standards for new power plants (New Source Performance Standards or NSPS) offers an opportunity to make market mechanisms cool again.

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  • Public Comments

    Comments to DOE on Retrospective Review

    June 19, 2012

    Policy Integrity submitted comments to the Department of Energy (DOE) on its plan for periodic retrospective review pursuant to Executive Order 13563, which asks agencies to consider how best to promote retrospective analyses of existing rules. We found that the DOE’s plan could do a better job of updating and expanding regulations to enhance net benefits rather than just minimization of compliance burdens and administrative cost cutting, which the plan largely focuses on.

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  • News

    Letter to EPA on Stormwater Regulations

    April 27, 2012

    Today, EPA was supposed to propose rules to curb stormwater run-off—the murky, polluted water that gushes into rivers and oceans after heavy rains. They now say the proposal will come in May.

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  • News

    EPA Releases NSPS for Power Plants

    March 27, 2012

    The EPA released its first ever greenhouse gas standards for new power plants after a delay at the beginning of the year. The New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) limit emissions from new plants to 1,000 pounds of carbon dioxide per megawatt hour of electricity produced.

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  • Public Comments

    Comments to EPA and DOT on CAFE Standards for Model Years 2017-2025

    February 13, 2012

    Cars that hit the streets in 2017 through 2025 will run on far less fuel than they do now. Last summer, the Obama Administration announced a deal with automakers aiming to up the average to 56 miles per gallon and EPA-DOT proposed a new rule that would hold them to that standard.

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  • Academic Articles/Working Papers

    Are Passenger Vehicles Positional Goods?

    February 10, 2012

    Are Passenger Vehicles Positional Goods? examines to what degree vehicles generate consumption externalities that are not currently corrected for by the market, and whether a
    uniform downward shift in the size of the passenger vehicle fleet will actually result in reduced consumer welfare.

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  • Academic Articles/Working Papers

    The Rebound Effect in a More Fuel Efficient Transportation Sector

    February 10, 2012

    Vehicle fuel efficiency improvements through Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards, may lead owners of more fuel-efficient cars may be driving more as their fuel cost per mile travelled decreases. It’s called the “rebound effect” and it has significant policy implications.

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  • Academic Articles/Working Papers

    The Energy Paradox and the Future of Fuel Economy Regulation

    February 10, 2012

    Are the benefits of raising the fuel efficiency of America’s auto fleet greater than the costs? The answer may depend on whether or not there is an energy paradox.

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  • News

    EPA Delays NSPS

    February 8, 2012

    The EPA has again delayed its proposal of New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) targeting greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. The agency passed a September settlement agreement deadline and has not set a date for the actual release.

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