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Viewing recent projects in Natural Resources
  • Comments to FERC on PennEast Amendment Project

    The PennEast 2020 Amendment Project, which provides for various additions to the proposed PennEast pipeline, would result in significant greenhouse gas emissions. We submitted comments on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commissions’s draft environmental assessment of the project, which fails to meaningfully assess the impact of emissions using social cost of carbon metrics.  

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  • BLM Cancels Oil and Gas Lease Sale in Utah’s Moab Region

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) announced its decision to exclude 87,000 acres of public lands from an upcoming lease sale, agreeing with arguments raised by policymakers and environmental advocates, including Policy Integrity, that these public lands are too valuable for other uses to be designated for fossil fuel extraction.

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  • Amicus Brief in D.C. Circuit on Tennessee Pipeline Extension

    If constructed, the Tennessee pipeline extension and related projects would be responsible for substantial greenhouse gas emissions. We submitted an amicus brief to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit that explains how FERC’s failure to quantify the project’s emissions and monetize climate damages using Social Cost of Carbon estimates is arbitrary.

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  • Comments to BLM on September 2020 Lease Sale in Utah

    A proposed oil and gas lease sale in Utah would offer over 100,000 acres located in areas valuable for recreation, wildlife, environmental conservation, cultural use, and tourism. We submitted comments detailing how the Bureau of Land Management’s environmental assessment neglects its duties to manage public lands for multiple use and consider more limited leasing scenarios. BLM also ignores the option value of delaying the leasing decision and, therefore, is unlikely to obtain fair market value for the nominated land parcels.

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  • Amicus Brief in Rio Grande LNG Case

    If constructed, the Rio Grande liquefied natural gas terminal and pipeline would be responsible for greenhouse gas emissions resulting in billions of dollars in climate damages. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s (FERC) analysis estimates the quantity of the project’s emissions but does not analyze the context, intensity, or significance of the incremental climate damages they will cause. We submitted an amicus brief to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit that explains how FERC’s failure to monetize the project’s climate damages using Social Cost of Carbon estimates is arbitrary.

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  • Comments to PHMSA on Data Collection from Pipeline Accidents

    The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) is proposing to gather additional data on pipeline accidents and fires, including data on injuries, property damage, and loss of natural gas. We submitted comments supporting PHMSA’s efforts to better assess the social cost of accidents and encouraging the agency to estimate greenhouse gas emissions that result from pipeline fires.

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  • New Resource Tracking Reduced Enforcement of Environmental Laws in Response to COVID-19

    The Institute for Policy Integrity is tracking altered enforcement of environmental laws by federal and state agencies in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. In connection with the crisis, several agencies have issued waivers or announced plans to stop enforcing key environmental laws and regulations. 

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  • Comments to FERC on Lamar County Natural Gas Project

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s (FERC) environmental assessment estimates that the Lamar County Expansion Project would result in 3.87 million metric tons of greenhouse gases from downstream emissions. We submitted comments suggesting that FERC monetize climate impacts using social cost of carbon estimates. The proposed natural gas project would result in over $200 million in annual climate costs.  

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  • Comments to EPA on Coal Combustion Residuals Rule

    Coal combustion residuals, commonly known as coal ash, are the residual substances that remain after burning coal. They contain several chemicals that are toxic to human health, including arsenic, boron, lead, and mercury. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule that amends the regulatory framework for the disposal of coal ash. We submitted comments in January detailing how EPA fails to analyze the forgone benefits of the regulatory changes, which extend deadlines and eligibility for facilities that lack appropriate disposal capacity. We also submitted comments in April focusing on the second part of EPA's proposal, which fails to assess the forgone benefits of allowing facilities to seek approval for alternative basin liners. 

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  • Comments to EPA on Federal Emissions Management from Oil and Gas Sources in Utah

    The Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Federal Implementation Plan (FIP) for managing emissions on the Uintah and Ouray Indian Reservation in Utah proposes control requirements for new, modified, and existing oil and natural gas sources. Despite forecasting that the requirements would lead to a substantial decrease in methane emissions, EPA severely underestimates resulting benefits through the use of an “interim” social cost of methane metric that disregards the best peer-reviewed science. We submitted joint comments detailing EPA’s failure to adequately monetize and evaluate the benefits of the FIP.

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