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Publications

Viewing all publications in Policy Briefs
  • The Value of Open
    Policy Brief

    The Value of Open

    An Update on Net Neutrality

    By Inimai M. Chettiar, J. Scott Holladay, and Jennifer Rosenberg
    September 22, 2010

    An open Internet allows anyone with an idea and a domain name to add content to the web for all to use. It’s a system that most believe works very well, generating billions in economic benefits for the American public every year. This policy brief analyzes the economic uncertainties of weakening our current, open Internet and sees potential trouble ahead if it is not preserved.

  • More Residual Risks
    Policy Brief

    More Residual Risks

    An Update on New York City Boilers

    By Kevin R. Cromar, Jason A Schwartz
    May 27, 2010

    Up to 259 lives could be saved every year if certain large buildings in New York City stopped burning dirty heating oil. Using newly available data, a reworked analysis finds that residual oil has even greater consequences than estimated in an earlier report.

  • Flooding the Market
    Policy Brief

    Flooding the Market

    The Distributional Consequences of the NFIP

    By J. Scott Holladay and Jason A Schwartz
    April 21, 2010

    The government’s flood insurance program gives discounts to homeowners who build in flood-prone areas, often causing significant environmental damage. In this analysis, the Institute for Policy Integrity finds that this practice can benefit wealthy owners of expensive homes at a cost to the average taxpayer.

  • CLEAR & The Economy
    Policy Brief

    CLEAR & The Economy

    Innovation, Equity, and Job Creation

    By J. Scott Holladay and Michael A. Livermore
    April 12, 2010

    The CLEAR Act, sponsored in the Senate by Maria Cantwell (D-WA) and Susan Collins (R-ME), would place a price on carbon, auction 100% of the pollution permits, and refund most of the revenue back to consumers. This brief found that pricing carbon would spur investment and innovation in new energy technologies, giving a substantial boost to industries like manufacturing and construction—both hit hard in the recent financial crisis. Relatively well-paying jobs would be generated in these sectors, helping to mop up the slack created by the recession.

  • Economists and Climate Change
    Policy Brief

    Economists and Climate Change

    Consensus and Open Questions

    By J. Scott Holladay, Jonathan Horne, and Jason A Schwartz
    November 4, 2009

    Economists and Climate Change: Consensus and Open Questions describes and analyzes the results of a survey sent to 289 economic experts on climate change. Over 84% of the respondents to the poll said that the effects of global warming will create significant risks to important sectors of the United States and global economies.