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  • Pruitt’s Delayed Chemical Plant Safety Rule Heads to Court

    March 16, 2018 – Bloomberg

    Challenges to an EPA rule delaying a chemical safety regulation aimed at protecting emergency responders being argued March 16 could pose a test of the Trump administration’s push to roll back regulations. “Agencies need explicit statutory authority for their actions,” Bethany Davis Noll, litigation director at the Institute for Policy Integrity at New York University School of Law.

  • Regulating Marketable Permits

    March 8, 2018 – The Regulatory Review (Opinion)

    Although cap-and-trade programs for government permits to emit carbon dioxide occasionally make headline news, the average American may not realize that billions of dollars’ worth of government permits are auctioned or traded in a wide variety of industries, from broadcasting to construction to fishing.

  • ‘Sloppy and Careless’: Courts Call Out Trump Blitzkrieg on Environmental Rules

    February 20, 2018 – The Guardian

    A cascade of courtroom standoffs are beginning to slow, and even reverse, the EPA rollbacks thanks to the administration’s ‘disregard for the law.’ “The Trump administration has been sloppy and careless, they’ve shown significant disrespect for rule of law and courts have called them on it,” said Richard Revesz, a professor at the New York University school of Law.

  • The Keys to Our Coastal Kingdom

    January 10, 2018 – US News and World Report (Opinion)

    The Trump administration’s new draft plan for offshore drilling represents a colossal shift in policy by proposing to make nearly all U.S. coastal waters available for oil and gas exploration. The administration has framed this proposal as a way to achieve “energy dominance,” but this claim doesn’t add up: The United States is already the world’s number one oil and natural gas producer. What is clear is that the administration’s approach entails major environmental and social risks and ignores basic economic facts, making it a terrible deal for the American public.

  • Rick Perry’s Proposed Coal Bailout Just Died an Unceremonious Death

    January 9, 2018 – Vox

    Late last year, Rick Perry’s Department of Energy issued a notice of proposed rulemaking asking the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to bail out beleaguered coal and nuclear plants.Yesterday, FERC officially responded: Thanks, but no thanks. “DOE’s bungling of this from the start (no coordination, proposal unlike a normal 206 proceeding, Perry’s performance at House Energy hearing) very likely hurt its ability to get near-term policy in the direction it wanted (even if less than cost-of-service),” Tweeted Avi Zevin, an attorney at the Institute for Policy Integrity.

  • Trump Stretches Meaning of Deregulation in Touting Achievements

    December 29, 2017 – Bloomberg

    In the Dec. 14 press conference, Trump said the government had taken 67 deregulatory actions through Sept. 30 — with an annual savings to society of $570 million — and had imposed just three new regulations. The administration’s cost figures ignore projected benefits for regulations it has blocked, distorting the actual impacts on society, said Denise Grab, a lawyer with the Institute for Policy Integrity at New York University’s School of Law.

  • The Biggest Environmental Rulings Of 2017

    December 15, 2017 – Law360

    Courts answered several important environmental law questions in 2017, including how the effects of greenhouse gases must be factored into project analyses. In August, a divided D.C. Circuit panel said the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission failed to adequately analyze the greenhouse gas emissions impacts of a project that it approved and ordered the agency to redo its environmental review. Ricky Revesz, a law professor at New York University and director of the Institute for Policy Integrity, said the ruling adds to a growing body of case law showing that federal agencies must meaningfully consider the greenhouse gas emission impacts of their policy decisions.

  • What We Talk About When We Talk About Resilience

    November 30, 2017 – Utility Dive (Opinion)

    In the coming weeks, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) will announce its response to the Department of Energy’s Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR). As long as FERC decides to do something, it has to deal with a fundamental issue. The NOPR failed to answer the most critical question: just what is resilience? This question is not just a matter of semantics. Without a precise definition, FERC cannot determine whether the grid is sufficiently resilient, or gauge whether payments or other actions might be warranted.

  • What Does Mulvaney’s Appointment Mean for the Future of CFPB?

    November 28, 2017 – USA Today

    “I do think it’s clear that Cordray’s departure will bring the CFPB closer into the president’s orbit,” said Richard L. Revesz, a law professor at New York University. “And the fact of the matter is that the director — the permanent director, whoever the president nominates — will also share the president’s agenda.”

  • EPA Revises the Social Cost of a Potent Greenhouse Gas

    November 20, 2017 – Scientific American

    Jason Schwartz, a research scholar at New York University School of Law, slammed the Trump administration’s changes to calculations for the social cost of greenhouse gases. “They have begun to manipulate those estimates in ways that are not at all consistent with the best science or economics,” he said. A guide on the social cost of greenhouse gases co-authored by Schwartz and published by NYU’s Institute for Policy Integrity argues that using a domestic-emissions-only approach doesn’t make sense for the United States or the rest of the world.